Everybody’s Got Pain

As I’m writing this blog post, the anesthesia from my root canal is wearing off. Needless to say, I’m in pain. A lot of pain.

This made me think about how we deal with pain.

Sometimes, if it’s bad enough, we just curl up under the covers and will ourselves to sleep until it’s over. However, too many people never have the luxury of allowing their pain to crash over them and carry them out to sea. These people – and they are usually poor people – are told to just “push through it” and “you can’t stay home with every little ache and pain.”

The implication being that if you give into pain you are weak, you are unworthy, and you are definitely not getting paid for today if you do.

Consequently, that’s how I knew now was a perfect time to get this post written. And so here we are.

Is this a sign of dedication to my craft, my blog? Of strength of character? Or of brainwashing and stupidity?

Hard to say.

So instead of whining about my own pitiful problems today I thought I’d tell you a little bit about my main character, Jake’s, tattoos.

Jake has a large slamming door tattooed on his back. It’s there so he won’t forget the night his father left forever, his mother screaming “Good riddance” at the empty air.

There’s an old coffee pot covered with spider webs on his left shoulder. It’s to remind himself of all the times five year old Jake got up at 2:30 am just to make his dad a cup of coffee when he returned from the bar. 

 

 

The yellow license plate, dinged and bent at one corner, that sits below his rib cage belongs to the car that killed his mother as she was crossing Roosevelt Boulevard when he was six.

 

Yeah, everybody’s got pain.

How do you deal with your own pain? Do you dive in, or try to ride it out? Also, what kind of pain have you dished out to your characters? And how do they deal with it?

I’d love to hear about it in the Comments section.

Thanks for reading.

Timelines

Hi everyone.

I’m currently stuck on my novel’s timeline, so I thought I’d share a bit of that hellishness with anybody out there.

Obviously timelines are important in any story, but especially in long,  complicated stories such as in a novel. Not only do you need to know what is happening in your novel, you need to know when it’s happening.

And if you’re a visual person like me it is so much better to see the important events in your story laid out in front of you than to merely think about them.

That’s where timelines come in. You can:

  • make your own with pen and paper,
  • use a calendar, or
  • find a program online.

 

 

I have, in the past, tried making my own and found that my ideal timeline consists of one, long sheet of paper tacked to my living room walls — satisfying, but not very practical.

Calendars are probably a lot of fun to use, but all those little boxes feel confining to me. Don’t judge me.

I’ve recently come across an online option on writershelpingwriters.net. They have a resource called One Stop for Writers that includes a 2 week free trial of all these cool features like Character Builders, Story Maps, Scene Maps, and you guessed it — Timelines. So far I’m really liking it.

Just so you know — I’m not affiliated with this group at all. I just thought you all would like to check them out.

Anyway, back to playing with my timeline.

How about you guys? Do you find timelines useful, or just another excuse NOT to be writing?

Please let me know in the Comments.

Thanks for reading.

10 Ways to Stay Creative Despite Everything

Writers, like most people, fall into slumps – you know where our brains aren’t capable of much more than wondering what to make for dinner? And even that can be too much sometimes.

So when the dreaded slumps hit you know it’s time to shake things up.

 

 

 

It used to be that just going out and socializing with friends would do the trick – talk all night about non-writing subjects, eat some tasty junk food, and maybe have a few beers – only that’s not really a good idea now, despite what some ignorant asshats say.

 

 

 

 

So, here are 10 ways to kick start your creativity in the Covid19 world we live in now.

  1. Create an Inspiration Board – also known as Vision Boards or Mood Boards —  This can be for your current novel or something else entirely. I made my first inspiration board when I was diagnosed with uterine cancer. I covered a large piece of foam core board with pictures of beauty and health, along with images of my ideal environment (a beach house down the shore). I placed it over my monitor and looked at it every day. It helped a lot.

2. Listen to music – I listen to instrumental stuff when I’m writing because the lyrics in songs just distract me. But when I’m not writing, I love rock, pop, rap, R & B, metal, and even — God help me — some country,  (hey, Kacey Musgraves and Shania Twain… ‘sup, girls?). Music wakes up my brain and fills my soul with gladness.

3. Meditate – I started meditating a few months back, and once I got into the swing of it I realized it really did spark my writer’s brain. Plus, doing it makes you feel just a little bit virtuous.

4. Watch Netflix – when your brain is running on empty you need to pick other people’s brains. Movies and TV shows are loaded with the creative ideas of many, many people so dive in – the water’s fine.

5. Get a new hobby/learn a new skill – depending on what you choose, this can be either relaxing or demanding. Either way it will get you out of your accursed writer’s head for a while.

6. Read books – both fiction and non-fiction. I’ve found that reading in my own genre tends to make me either contemptuous or envious – neither of which is good for me. So I try to read in other genres when I read fiction. Non-fiction really ignites my brain, especially the well-written stuff. Unfamiliar times, events, and people turn me on and always give me new ideas for stories. Reading Dragon Teeth, by Michael Crichton right now.

7. Doodle or sketch – even if you’re not artistic. This is tough if you’re not artistic, but once you chain your ego to a parking meter outside (where it can bark its little heart out), it is very freeing and a lot of fun.

8. Take naps – oh, I can hear people screaming about naps being “a waste of time” now, but really, studies show that a refreshed brain is a productive brain. Take that, Corporate America.

9. Learn how to cook a new cuisine – if your idea of “ethnic cuisine” is Taco Tuesday, maybe you should branch out a little. So far I’ve cooked vegetarian, Indian, Ethiopian, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese meals. Be brave. Even less than perfect meals tastes great.

10. Have sex – this is kind of a tricky one as far as stimulating one’s creativity goes. Some people feel energized afterwards, while others just feel sleepy. However, considering the amount of physical, emotional, and psychological energy being exchanged here it certainly couldn’t hurt.

 

 

 

 

 

Safe sex, everyone!

How about you?

What are some of the ways you keep your creativity all shiny and new?

Let me know in the Comments section.

Thanks for reading.

3 Things I Do Before I Write

Hi everyone.

Writing is such a personal, intimate act – when we’re not letting total strangers take a peek inside our innermost thoughts and dreams, we’re spilling our guts for them – so it makes sense that every writer has their own process for getting in the mood and/or making the writing habit happen. Some people can’t write without burning their favorite candle, or listening to their favorite music/white noise (hello, Coffitivity). It’s pretty much guaranteed to be different for every single writer out there.

Today I want to share some of the things I do to prepare my own brain for writing.

#1 – COFFEE. Duh.

 

 

 

 

#2 – BULLET JOURNAL – I write in mine every morning listing all the stuff I want/need to get done during the day. In addition, I also note the following items without fail — these are the date, the weather, time I got up, and what song was stuck in my head when I woke up. (Today’s earworm was “If Our Love is Wrong,” by Calum Scott.)

 

#3 – TAROT and ORACLE – No point in just charging into a big, uncaring world all willy-nilly. Absolutely anything could be out there waiting for you.

With that in mind I invite the universe to give me a “heads up” every morning by pulling one card each from both my tarot deck and my oracle deck.

Today I got THE DEVIL (be careful about chaining yourself to the things that pull you down) and the WOLF (practicing tolerance will help balance out some of that agitated wolf energy), respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now I’m not sure if these are for me, or the characters in the book I’m working on.

Either way, by this point I’m usually ready to take my reheated coffee upstairs to my office and start writing.

How about you?

What are some of your writing habits or routines?

Let me know in the Comments section.

Thanks for reading.

Terrible Strange: Behind the Scenes

Hi everyone.

Today I’m going to take you behind the scenes of my first novel, tentatively titled Terrible Strange. I started this and completed a rough first draft when I was in grad school a couple of years ago. However, there was so much wrong with it that I decided to put it away for a while – it just wasn’t speaking to me, you know?

Anyway, it did start speaking to me a few months ago so I set about rewriting it. I’ve changed the POV, made the characters older, took them out of high school and put them in grad school, got rid of the clichéd “angry dad” character, and did a LOT more digging into my protagonist’s backstory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have also left behind “pantsing” in favor of plotting.

I’m not gonna lie – it’s been a struggle to make such a big change to my writing process, but whenever you combine pantsing with ADD all you get is a hot mess that kinda looks like a story. At least, that’s been my experience.

 

 

 

 

So, I checked out a bunch of different plotting books – there are so many good ones – and loved two books in particular: Save the Cat Writes a Novel, by Jessica Brody and Story Genius, by Lisa Cron.

I was already familiar with Blake Snyder’s Save the Cat series from my screenwriting days, and Lisa Cron’s blueprint method of building a story that has both internal logic and a sense of urgency is brilliant. Plus, constantly asking yourself, and your characters, questions – as she recommends – really, really works. Who knew?

 

 

Anyway, despite my lack of productivity – God, how I wish I could regularly churn out 2,000 words a day like my OCD girl idols on YouTube – I have still managed to reach the midpoint in my novel. Yay!

How about you? Have you ever rewritten something from scratch because the story just wouldn’t let you go? No matter how hard you tried to leave it in the box of shame, or the folder of forgetfulness?

Please let me know in the Comment section.

Thanks for reading.